history_admin

Walkden

A principally agricultural and rural area, part of the parish of Eccles,  until well into the eighteenth century, much of the land farmed was leased from the Bridgewater Estate. The Bridgewater canal reached Walkden in 1770 and ushered in the industrial age with the development of mining as the area was sitting on rich coal seams, and the opening of a boatyard while the collection of the up to then hamlets in the area began to form the town. One…

Read More

Boothstown

Named from the “the Booths”, derived from the name given to the huts that housed the manor herdsmen, its origins go back to Roman times with a hoard of coins dated 289 – 296 A.D. was found at Boothsbank in 1989. Modern Day Boothstown lay on the Roman Road heading North West. Part of the Manor of Worsley,  Henry de Worsley of Worsley gave a share in the estate of Booths to Robert in 1323, his son by his second wife.…

Read More

Ordsall Hall

img_6964

As one nineteenth century writer noted, the glamour in which the skill of Harrison Ainsworth has woven around Ordsall Hall, making it the resort of Guy Fawkes and his co conspirators gives it a strange hold on the imagination. “Though much gone to decay, grievously neglected and divided into three separate houses”, wrote Ainsworth, back in 1841,” it still retains much of its original character and beauty and viewed at the magic hour, against a warm and still glowing western…

Read More

Ordsall

Lying on the bend of the River Irwell, Ordsall was part of the Demense of the Earl of Derby until 1251 when he exchanged it for land in Pendleton held by the De Hulton Family. Eighty years later it changed hands again to a branch of the Radclyffe family who would be the builders of Ordsall Hall in the fourteenth century when Sir Alexander Radclyffe was Sheriff of Lancashire. The area, said to be the inspiration behind Tony Warren’s idea…

Read More

Swinton

Swinton which belonged to Whalley Abbey during early the middle aged was an agricultural area until the start of the industrial revolution. The mining of coal at the Agecroft Colliery would change that and cotton spinning and brick making moved into the area while much of the rural estate of Swinton Park would be developed. Swinton became a commuter town,especially with the opening of the East Lancs Road in the 1930’s, the UK’s first purpose built intercity highway. Along with…

Read More

Langworthy

Named after Edward Ryley Langworthy, industrialist, Mayor of Salford and briefly its MP, this part of Salford along with next door Ordsall, forms part of the city’s focus for major regeneration and investment activity Today it is probably most famously known for its small but popular Chimney Pot Park, built on the site of a former reservoir See section on Pendleton

Read More

Little Hulton

One of the satellite Towns outside the boundaries of Salford, it was chosen to rehouse people from the city in the post Second World War slum clearances. Between 1949 and 1962 in a scheme dubbed ‘the Worsley Project, over eighteen thousand people were rehoused on four new estates, one of the estates, The Mount Skip had its roads named after places in Salford. Hulton was part of the manor of Worsley containing  three townships, Over Hulton, Middle Hulton and Little…

Read More

Cadishead

Cadishead, shares much of its history with Irlam, a little village with fourteen houses grouped around a village green, the surrounding fields were blue, growing flax to supply the Warrington textile market. Back in 1212, the first record showed that the whole of Cadishead (then called ‘Cadwalensate’) was rented from King John by one Gilbert Notton for the sum of four shillings a year. Cadishead Moss was drained in 1852, owning up the land to farming but as with Irlam…

Read More

Irlam

The village of Irwelham, meaning village on the Irwell, lay between Chat Moss and the Rivers Irwell and Mersey leaving a narrow corridor through which the highway between Manchester and Liverpool ran. Stagecoaches would leave Manchester at 6am, horses would be changed at Irlam where passengers would breakfast, they would dine at Warrington, drink tea at Prescot and arrive in Liverpool at nightfall. Irlam Hall was founded in the fifteenth century as the home of the De Irlam family, Sir…

Read More

Barton upon Irwell

Most famous for its Swing Aqueduct which was constructed between 1890 and 1894 to replace Brindley’s stone aqueduct of 1761 carrying the Bridgewater Canal across the River Irwell. Part of the township of Eccles, lying on the banks of the River Irwell, it is first mentioned in 1195, held by the family of the same name, who would marry into the family of Manchester’s Lord De Grelley, the Booths Barton would retain it for the next three hundred years before it…

Read More